Spekulatius Cookies

Roopa Spekulatius (or ‘Speculoos’ or ‘Speculaas’) are a spiced shortcrust biscuit from …Europe? It would seem that there is a lot of debate over where these cookies originate from. They are thin, crunchy cookies, and are typically made in a hand carved wooden mold. I was more than a little bit excited to make these! … More Spekulatius Cookies

Candied Oranges

Roopa We talked specifically about oranges, but this applies for any other fruit as well. DIRECTIONS Cut the peel into nice quarters Blanch the orange peels by submerging them in boiling water for 20 – 30 seconds. This cleans the skin, and also opens the cells so they can absorb sugar Put the peels into … More Candied Oranges

Kipferl Cookies

Roopa The kipferl cookie is similar to a sugar cookie, and is an Austrian cookie that means “crescent”. They are allegedly supposed to represent the first snowfall on the rooftops of Vienna.

Aachener Printen

Roopa These cookies originated in the city of Aachen. While they were traditionally sweetened with honey, they began sweetening them with sugar beets when Napoleon issued a trade embargo affecting the availability of honey.

Swiss Brunsli Cookies

Roopa This is a relatively newer cookie, as chocolate was not traditionally available. Still delicious though! They are named after their colour (bruun) and are a classic Swiss cookie. They are made with sugar on top which provides a characteristic crunch.

Elisen Lebkuchen

Roopa Lebkuchen is a type of Christmas cookie. While they are commonly translated as being gingerbread, this is a misconception as they do not actually contain ginger! The Elisen lebkuchen originated in Nuremberg around 1500, and must contain at least 25% nuts.

Sweet Pastry

Roopa I reference sweet pastry (or sweet paste) in a bunch of other posts, so I felt it deserved its own post! It’s a really versatile pastry that can be used in both sweet and savoury dishes, and works very well as a stable and delicious base for cheesecakes. I don’t have a great photo … More Sweet Pastry

(English) Gingerbread

Roopa I know, I know. Why English gingerbread in a German baking class? They’re actually quite different, as German “gingerbread” (lebkuchen) doesn’t use any ginger; rather, it uses rye flour and honey to get that particular flavour. German lebkuchen tends to be quite soft and not ideal for making gingerbread structures, which is why we … More (English) Gingerbread